I was sitting in a religion class, listening to the dull subject of Fall of Man, when a classmate read from the Holy Bible itself.

Now the serpent was more subtil any beast of the field which the Lord God had made.

This single sentence is quite interesting. God had made the serpent that lured the naïve Eve to eat a fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. Why did God create a serpent – residing in the Garden of Eden – well-knowing that its intention was to pursaude Eve to eating the fruit? And why did God create Humans with the free will to eat of the tree keeping the fact that God didn’t want Adam and Eve to eat the fruits in mind?

For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil.

The next question is, why doesn’t God want Adam and Eve to recognise good and evil?

My conclusion of this were that if God created Humans in his image, to be pursauded by the subtil serpent he created in his image into eating of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, he must be the original sinner, but blamed the Humans.

I was reading a list of the 25 best quotes, and I must be honest that only the one Albert Einstein that ranked the top was worth its status, but then this one came across my eyes. I didn’t believe it, and had to try it. It doesn’t have a hidden message, and is quite obvious. Think when you point at someone. Why are you pointing?

It’s often an accusation. “Who did it?” and you point. It’s a good thing to have in mind.

I think this one is pretty obvious. I Denmark we have a saying about liberalism, I don’t know if you also have it in your country, but it goes like this “Each Man is his own Fortune smith” (DA: Hver mand er sin egen lykkes smed). If liberalists wanted to create their own fortune, why invent universal education to help those who wouldn’t succeed otherwise?

Now remember, just because Hitler said it, it doesn’t mean his wrong or should be hanged for saying it.

When I found this quote, I knew it had to come here. It is as much criticism towards Islam as to the whole concept of belief in religion. Islam has many fine, strong and well made points, yet some seems to be a bit out of order.

I know the story behind the whole ‘Don’t eat pork’ thing. The pigs in the seventh century was sick and unhealthy, so it was suggested that people didn’t eat pork. Unfortunately, to the dissatisfaction of Muslims, they haven’t realised that pigs are edible now.

It also critise how religious believers tend to believe in anything, regardless of how stupid it may seem. Science then was idiotically stupid, while science now actually confirms religion.

* Please read the comment from Big Mike aswell regarding the second paragraph.

I wrote this a few days ago. It’s ironic, yet rather true. I believe I was twelve when I started thinking, and sometimes I find myself thinking: Seemingly thinking is becoming a rarety only few are gifted with.

When I say ‘thinking’, I’m not talking about ordinary thought passing through our brains, but realisations and deeper thoughts on subjects such as life and the commotions around it.

This is one of my absolutte favourite quotes in all time. It’s relatively simple to understand and interpret. It’s a comment, logical argument against capital punishment and war.

I think of the Iraq war: One of the reasons President George W. Bush Jr. declared war on Saddam Hussein was that he was murdering his own people, the Iraqi. I tend to believe that the argument is anti-american in every way as the USA is famous for it’s warmongering, loose guncontrol and high level of capital punishment.

It is a well-known fact that pupils and student tend to forget what they learn in school. The pace in schools is too high, and the schools are aware of it. It’s ridiculous, because when the students have learned yet forgotten what they’ve learned, the education remains. It’s a piece of paper truthfully saying that the pupil have successfully gone through the school system.

The point of this quote is quite simple. It’s common to deal with problems during ones life, and some of these problems may put us in a wrong direction. Addictions that overwhelm one or you ‘hang with you wrong crowd’. But even if you’re on the right track, you have to move even if you’re frightened to go in the wrong direction. Otherwise you will end up doing nothing. And doing nothing automatically puts you off track.

If I remember right, Henry Ford was able to make cars at an extraordinary speed compared to other car companies, so I guess this is his secret. Not much of a secret, but at least he’s right.

I know I’ve posted a lot of quotes of Albert Einstein, but I wanted to add this now, because it relates to reality more than many others. Many pupils have asked their teachers, ‘What can I use this for in reality?’, and just as often this has been asked, it haven’t been answered, which is why Einstein is correct. If a mathematic law is absolutely certain, it won’t refer to reality, but to the world of theoritic mathematics.